Eclipse GlassFish Release Plan

UPDATED!

Yesterday, the release plan for Eclipse GlassFish was announced on the EE4J mailing list. For convenience, I have repeated the plan here:

September 18
All code required for GF build contributed.

September 23
Eclipse GlassFish builds.

October 1
Java EE 8 CTS testing. We are able to run CTS tests on Eclipse GlassFish.

October 22 ⚡
CI/CD release pipelines completed.

October 22
Eclipse GlassFish 5.1-RC1 milestone release.

November 5 ⚡
Dependencies updated. All projects are released to OSSRH and have dependencies to Eclipse version of other components.

November 30 ⚡
Release Review completed.

December 14 ⚡
Eclipse GlassFish 5.1 release. All CTS tests are passed.

There is a lot of work to do, so every contribution is appreciated, especially regarding setting up the CI/CD pipelines for all the EE4J projects. Take a look at our status sheet and sign up where you think you can contribute.

Ozark becomes Eclipse Krazo

One of the requirements for Eclipse Projects is that the name is not associated with any trademarks or potential trademarks. When we created the project proposal for Ozark, this turned out to be the case here. The name Ozark is simply used too many places for it to be a valid Eclipse project name.

So, how did we come up with the new name? First of all, we asked for input on the Ozark developer mailing list. We also wrote a small program that generated all permutations of ‘ozark’ to see if something cool came out of that.

Then we started filtering, discussion and voting until we ended up with Krazo, which turns out to be Ozark spelled backward. We are really excited about the new name and hope you all will join us in spreading the word that the reference implementation of MVC 1.0 that was previously known as Ozark is now called Eclipse Krazo.

Setting sails for Jakarta EE!

The future of Cloud Native Java with Jakarta EE is here! The Jakarta EE website was launched today with lots of information, news and resources, including the new results of the 2018 Developer Survey.I even got my blog posts about the relationship between Jakarta EE, EE4J and Java EE listed in FAQ section. The website even features the new Jakarta EE logo.

I should be honest and say that it wasn’t my first choice when I voted, but when I see it in use with different colors and backgrounds, I must admit that it looks pretty good.

The initial strategic and participating members of the Jakarta EE working group are also listed on the website.

It is pretty awesome to see this list of companies participating and supporting Jakarta EE! And the list is likely to expand as more companies join. The future of Cloud Native Java is Jakarta EE, and the future looks bright. Let’s set the sails and sail towards the future (finally got the logo, I think…).

https://jakarta.ee