MVC 1.0 goes to Eclipse Foundation

Last year when waiting for my flight home from JavaOne, I blogged Possible Ways forward for MVC 1.0. Now, I am sitting here at SFO again writing a follow-up on that article.

As we all now, the JSR was was transferred to me from Oracle to be completed as a standalone JSR. Since then, Christian Kaltepoth has joined me as specification lead. We never did anything about the actual IP, all in full agreement. After all, we are developers and not lawyers and just wanted to get going with the actual work.

It has never been my intention to capitalize on the IP, and I wanted to figure out a way to donate it all back to the community. As those of you who follow the EE4J Community Mailing List probably noticed, I announced the intention to transfer MVC 1.0 to Eclipse Foundation. Read the announcement here:

https://dev.eclipse.org/mhonarc/lists/ee4j-community/msg00106.html

This does not imply any changes to the current specification work, expert group or time plan. There may be some practical changes, such as a new mailing list and moving the repositories under the Eclipse GitHub Organization, but that is way in the future.

So why Eclipse and not Apache?
Well, it makes sense to follow the other Java EE technologies when they are transferred to the EE4J umbrella project in Eclipse Foundation. MVC would be a natural fit there, but the exact details will be handled by the EE4J PMC.

 

 

Welcome to the #javatrain

Usually, you would expect 10 to follow after 9. But in the world of Java™, things move a little faster. Or at least it will be if the proposed release model in Mark Reinhold’s blog post Moving Java Forward Faster is adopted.

The next version of Java™ will then be versioned as 18.3 and be delivered as soon as March 2018. Then we will get version 18.9 in September, and so on.

In my opinion, this is pretty cool. Having a time-based release cycle for Java™ allows for developers to get smaller features delivered faster without the need to wait for the bigger, more time consuming, features to be completed.

I am convinced this proposal will be discussed and commented a lot in the community, so be sure to follow the #javatrain hashtag on Twitter.

JavaOne Streak 2017

JavaOne is only one month away and it is time to get out of that chair and start moving! That means that JavaOneStreak is on again for the fourth time in a row. The JavaOneStreak initiative was originally started by Arun Gupta back in 2014.

Do some kind of physical activity each day during the month* before JavaOne, log it and share with the hashtag #JavaOneStreak.

You don’t even have to go to JavaOne, but tell us if you are so we can meet up and brag about our achievements.

JavaOneStreak 2014 – Ivar, Heather and Leo
JavaOneStreak 2015 – Leo, Heather and Ivar

*Of course you don’t have to limit it to a month. Try to follow Heinz’ example and run a mile every day year long.

Possible Ways forward for MVC 1.0

As mentioned in Aggressive Road Map for Java EE 8, MVC 1.0 is left out of the plans for Java EE 8.

The way I see it, and also have indications from several people I have talked with during JavaOne, the possible outcomes of this are:

1. MVC is dropped completely
2. MVC continues and is included in Java EE 8 (JSR 366)
3. MVC continues as a standalone specification outside of the Java EE 8 umbrella spec

Let’s cross our fingers that the survey result turns out positive for MVC and that option 1 is ruled out by the community.

If we’re honest, option 2 is probably not very likely to happen. Given the aggressive road map for EE 8, cuts will need to be made. And MVC certainly isn’t on the list of the preliminary proposal.

Then we are left with the third option. And I actually think this may be the best way for MVC. There are several reasons for this:

Release Cycle

MVC will not be depending on the Java EE 8 release and may release earlier and more oftenJava EE 8 is going to include some form of modularity and MVC may very well be one of these modules no matter if left out of EE 8. There are also some considerations to take if this option is explored

Portable RI

Ozark needs to be made portable across Java EE implementations. This means that we will need to get rid of the dependencies on internal Jersey APIs and base the entire implementation on APIs and SPIs that are available in Java EE 7 (and later Java EE 8 and 9)TCK

Licensing

An open TCK under for example Apache 2.0 will enable us to easier use community input for developing the TCK. If Oracle is willing to let go of the TCK, they will also be relieved of the cost of creating it. This actually also applies to Ozark. It would be great if it could be developed under e.g. Apache 2.0

So, what you should do is to fill out the survey by following the link below:

http://glassfish.org/survey

 

Aggressive Road Map for Java EE

After almost a year of silence, Oracle presented a preliminary proposed road map for Java EE. It is an aggressive one and will require dedicated hard work in the Expert Groups to make it happen.

There are some interesting new JSRs coming up regarding configuration and health check in addition to the changes going to happen in the existing ones. Worth noting is also that MVC 1.0 is left out entirely from this proposal.

On the other hand, also note that it is still just a preliminary proposal, and that we as a Community are invited to give our input through a new Java EE Community Survey.

Make sure to show your support by participating in this survey!

http://glassfish.org/survey

 

So, I am still optimistic and still believe that what I was hinting at in my previous post The Future of Java EE May Be Bright After All may actually come true!

The Future of Java EE May Be Bright After All

I don’t think anybody with the slightest interest in server-side Java™, and Java EE in particular, have missed the frustrations (and anger) in the community for the hiatus regarding the specification work of Java EE 8. The activity for most of the Java EE 8 targeted JSRs have more or less stagnated for almost a year, with only a few exceptions.

This has resulted in initiatives such as the Java EE Guardians and the Microprofile.io. Both emerging from a community eager to move Java EE forward to continue being the preferred platform for enterprise Java™.

The minutes from the August meeting in the JCP Executive Committee indicates that Oracle is finally beginning to move. At the meeting, Anil Gaur, Oracle Group Vice President with responsibility for Java EE and WebLogic Server, said:

“…We would like the future of Java EE to be viable to next generation of applications. These apps are composed and deployed differently in cloud and require flexibility, reliability and scale. The platform needs a new programming model that’s geared towards reactive style programming for building large-scale distributed applications that are loosely coupled…”

This year’s JavaOne will definitely be exciting in terms of Java EE. If you haven’t registered yet, do so!

I am carefully optimistic and think that Java EE has a bright future!

JavaOne is all about Community

JavaOne 2015 is a wrap!

2015-10-30 10.10.00

Five days packed with technical sessions, discussions, community building…It is such a blast!

I have heard more than once that this conference is more about the people than the technology. And I totally agree with that.

Since I am pretty heavy involved in the Java Community Process (JCP), many of my activities this year (as last year) was connected to this. I was interviewed on NightHacking about the JCP in general as well as the JSRs I am on the expert group of (368, 371 and 375). I also managed to get in a word or two about Snoop with input from Arun Gupta.

In addition to my planned sessions, CON1615Meet Snoop – a Discovery Service for Java EE and BOF3666How would you like to improve the Java EE Security API, I was also on stage at the CON4176: Introduction to MVC 1.0 (JSR 371).

Thursday morning we had a very productive Face-to-Face meeting in the JMS 2.1 Expert Group (JSR 368). The minutes from this meeting can be found here.

Last, but not least, thanks to Tomitribe for gathering together the #usualsuspects and making sure everyone is having a good time.

Meet Snoop @ JavaOne

JavaOne in San Francisco is less than a month away. If you have not registered yet, do so now!

j1-468x60-2590159

So far so good! Then you will need to add sessions you want to attend to to your personal schedule. Make sure you don’t wait until the last moment. The most popular sessions tend to fill up pretty fast.

My presentation Meet Snoop – a Discovery Service for Java EE may be can be found in the Schedule Builder by searching for CON1615. Add it to your schedule so that you are sure to get a seat. It may fill up…

2014 Conferences

I know it is a bit early to sum up the year in November, but since I have not planned any more conference talks this year I think I will do it anyway. As the picture shows I have been pretty active this year.

 

2014-11-08 12.15.31

I have been presenting at conferences in Norway (Software 2014), Sweden (Javaforum, Øredev), Germany (Javaland), Poland (JDD), Ukraine (JEEConf, JavaDayKiev) and Morocco (JMaghreb). In addition to my speaker appearances, I was also able to attend JavaOne in San Francisco where I got to meet a lot of people in the JCP and ended up being selected to the Expert Group for JSR 371 – MVC 1.0.

I hope to continue speaking at a lot of conferences next year as well. Talks have already been accepted by jDays and Javaland, so it looks promising.

Building up to JavaOne

I am sitting at a Starbuck’s with a dark roast in my hand looking over some photos from Yesterday’s stroll in San Francisco. Some of them are pretty cool, so I’ll share them here…

What do you do with your boat after having won America’s Cup? Well, if your name is Larry you will probably use it as roof over a street you have closed for a week while hosting a party for 50-60.000 of your closest friends…

Oracle OpenWorld and JavaOne
Oracle OpenWorld and JavaOne
Howard Street
Howard Street