Join the Java Community Process

You have probably noticed that the Java Community Process (JCP) has made becoming a member much easier. There is a new membership level called Associate Member which does not require any paperwork or approval of your employer and it can all be done online filling out a simple form.

https://jcp.org

Why should you become a member?

– It looks good on your resume
– You can join as a contributor to any JSR and help evolve the Java ecosystem
– You get a vote in the upcoming elections for the Executive Committee

Why is the last item important?

Well, I am running for an associate seat in the EC, so by joining the JCP and voting for me in the upcoming election, you make sure that your voice is heard at the very top level of the JCP. My motivation is to give as much power to the community as possible.

Let’s make the JCP Great Again!

 

Please feel free to contact me on Twitter or discuss in the comment section if you have any questions or comments.

Possible Ways forward for MVC 1.0

As mentioned in Aggressive Road Map for Java EE 8, MVC 1.0 is left out of the plans for Java EE 8.

The way I see it, and also have indications from several people I have talked with during JavaOne, the possible outcomes of this are:

1. MVC is dropped completely
2. MVC continues and is included in Java EE 8 (JSR 366)
3. MVC continues as a standalone specification outside of the Java EE 8 umbrella spec

Let’s cross our fingers that the survey result turns out positive for MVC and that option 1 is ruled out by the community.

If we’re honest, option 2 is probably not very likely to happen. Given the aggressive road map for EE 8, cuts will need to be made. And MVC certainly isn’t on the list of the preliminary proposal.

Then we are left with the third option. And I actually think this may be the best way for MVC. There are several reasons for this:

Release Cycle

MVC will not be depending on the Java EE 8 release and may release earlier and more oftenJava EE 8 is going to include some form of modularity and MVC may very well be one of these modules no matter if left out of EE 8. There are also some considerations to take if this option is explored

Portable RI

Ozark needs to be made portable across Java EE implementations. This means that we will need to get rid of the dependencies on internal Jersey APIs and base the entire implementation on APIs and SPIs that are available in Java EE 7 (and later Java EE 8 and 9)TCK

Licensing

An open TCK under for example Apache 2.0 will enable us to easier use community input for developing the TCK. If Oracle is willing to let go of the TCK, they will also be relieved of the cost of creating it. This actually also applies to Ozark. It would be great if it could be developed under e.g. Apache 2.0

So, what you should do is to fill out the survey by following the link below:

http://glassfish.org/survey

 

Aggressive Road Map for Java EE

After almost a year of silence, Oracle presented a preliminary proposed road map for Java EE. It is an aggressive one and will require dedicated hard work in the Expert Groups to make it happen.

There are some interesting new JSRs coming up regarding configuration and health check in addition to the changes going to happen in the existing ones. Worth noting is also that MVC 1.0 is left out entirely from this proposal.

On the other hand, also note that it is still just a preliminary proposal, and that we as a Community are invited to give our input through a new Java EE Community Survey.

Make sure to show your support by participating in this survey!

http://glassfish.org/survey

 

So, I am still optimistic and still believe that what I was hinting at in my previous post The Future of Java EE May Be Bright After All may actually come true!

JCP EC 2016 Nomination

The Java Community Process (JCP) program 2016 Executive Committee (EC)
Elections have started. This is the first election to be held under the newest JCP 2.10 Process Document rules.

One of the new things introduced is that there will be two Associate Seats in the Expert Committee. These seats are elected by the Associate members of the JCP.

I have nominated myself for one of these Associate Seats. See my position statement below.

JCP EC 2016 Position Statement

The Future of Java EE May Be Bright After All

I don’t think anybody with the slightest interest in server-side Java™, and Java EE in particular, have missed the frustrations (and anger) in the community for the hiatus regarding the specification work of Java EE 8. The activity for most of the Java EE 8 targeted JSRs have more or less stagnated for almost a year, with only a few exceptions.

This has resulted in initiatives such as the Java EE Guardians and the Microprofile.io. Both emerging from a community eager to move Java EE forward to continue being the preferred platform for enterprise Java™.

The minutes from the August meeting in the JCP Executive Committee indicates that Oracle is finally beginning to move. At the meeting, Anil Gaur, Oracle Group Vice President with responsibility for Java EE and WebLogic Server, said:

“…We would like the future of Java EE to be viable to next generation of applications. These apps are composed and deployed differently in cloud and require flexibility, reliability and scale. The platform needs a new programming model that’s geared towards reactive style programming for building large-scale distributed applications that are loosely coupled…”

This year’s JavaOne will definitely be exciting in terms of Java EE. If you haven’t registered yet, do so!

I am carefully optimistic and think that Java EE has a bright future!

Java Champion

I am extremely proud and honored to be included in this exclusive group of Java dignitaries.

The Java Champions are an exclusive group of passionate Java technology and community leaders who are community-nominated and selected under a project sponsored by Oracle. Learn more about Java Champions.

MVC 1.0 Generator

The JPA Modeler plugin for NetBeans provides visual support for creating, designing and editing entity relationship models. It also provides Java code generation and new for version 1.5.5 is that it provides support for generating MVC 1.0 applications.

Check out MVC 1.0 Generator Tutorial to see how it works.

JSP

Kudos to Gaurav Gupta (@jGauravGupta) for this awesome tool! Another proof that NetBeans is the IDE for developing Java EE applications!

Follow @jpamodeler on Twitter!

Javaforum Malmö – a Fresh Start

I am pleased to announce that I will take over as JUG leader in the Malmö branch of Javaforum in Sweden. As a first step we will follow our friends from the other locations in Sweden and move to Meetup. The old site at http://jforum.se has been around for 10 years and time has come to try out some more modern options.

Make sure you register yourself to stay up-to-date on what’s going on in your local Java Community.

Javaforum Malmö
Thanks to Cybercom for sponsoring the Meetup subscription.

 

Java EE Security API Moving Forward

The Java EE Security API (JSR 375) is moving forward, as summarised by Arjan Tijms here: http://arjan-tijms.omnifaces.org/p/whats-new-in-java-ee-security-api-10.html.

One thing to note is that we now have a name for the reference implementation, namely Soteria. The name originates from Greek Mythology where Soteria was the goddess of safety and salvation [Wikipedia]. Our Soteria can be found on GitHub (https://github.com/javaee-security-spec/soteria) and also has a Twitter handle. Follow @Soteria_RI.

The Soteria GitHub repo contains a couple of samples that demonstrates the features implemented so far. I have created a couple of additional examples where I combine Soteria with other Java EE technologies, such as MVC and JSF. These can be found in https://github.com/ivargrimstad/security-samples.

As the following code shows, it is fairly straightforward to define an embedded identity store for an MVC 1.0 application.

The examples will be evolved as the specification and Soteria continues to evolve.

NetBeans Dream Team

It is great to start 2016 with the announcement that I have been included in the NetBeans Dream Team!

I always try to be as objective and unbiased as possible when writing and talking about tools and technologies, but I guess it has been pretty obvious that NetBeans is my favorite IDE and in my opinion the best IDE for Java EE development. Being a member of the Dream Team will enable me to contribute even more to make this great tool even greater.

More information about the NetBeans Dream Team can be found on the wiki.