Jakarta EE 8 Status

Those of you following Jakarta EE probably know that the upcoming Jakarta EE 8 release will be functionally equivalent to Java EE 8. The reason for this is that we want to prove that the transfer from Oracle is complete and that we are able to produce the processes, specifications, test suites and a compatible implementation through the Eclipse Foundation.

So far Eclipse GlassFish 5.1 has been released and certified as Java EE 8 compatible. The next step is to set everything up for Jakarta EE 8 and release Eclipse GlassFish 5.2 as Jakarta EE 8 compatible.

One of the tasks that need to be done in order to release Jakarta EE 8 is to transform the existing Java EE specification documents to Jakarta EE. This will involve renaming the specifications according to the trademark agreement between Oracle and Eclipse Foundation*.

In addition to this, the scope for the existing EE4J projects containing the APIs for the individual specs will need to be updated and the projects themselves will be converted into Jakarta EE specification projects as defined in the Eclipse Foundation Specification Process (EFSP). The Jakarta EE Specification process will be a specialization of the EFSP.

To keep track of all of this, we have created a planning board in the Jakarta EE Platform GitHub project.

Planning board for transitioning Java EE 8 specifications to Jakarta EE 8
Planning board for transforming the Java EE specification to Jakarta EE

What I have described in this post is just a couple of the things that need to be done regarding the specifications in order to get Jakarta EE 8 out the door. There are a lot of other activities involving the TCK and not the least Eclipse GlassFish 5.2 that need to be done as well. But for now, the most critical item is to get through the legal hurdles of the trademark agreement and the transfer of the specification documents over to Eclipse Foundation.

*) The details of this agreement is yet to be defined when this blog post is published.

Jakarta EE Developer Survey 2019

The Jakarta EE 2019 Developer Survey is available!

Take the survey today and help the community gain a better understanding of what’s in store for Java innovation. This is your chance to share your thoughts and experiences and help shape the future for Jakarta EE!

Jakarta EE 2019 Developer Survey
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/JakartaEEMkt

Responses will be collected until March 25, 2019, at 11:59 PM Pacific Time

Have You Tried the MicroProfile Starter Yet?

The SPRING INITIALIZR at https://start.spring.io has been around for a while and is the best way to bootstrap a new Spring Boot application.

So far, there hasn’t been a similar way to bootstrap a new MicroProfile project even if the different vendors have provided starters for their implementations. But the wait is over! The MicroProfile Starter is currently in “Beta”, but works like a charm. Just navigate to https://start.microprofile.io and start generating.

https://start.microprofile.io

Based on which version of MicroProfile you select, you will get the available implementations that supports that particular version. You have the option of generating examples for the specifications included in the selected version. This is an excellent way to learn how the different technologies work.

#OSSRRR at Devnexus 2019

Devnexus 2019

Devnexus 2019 is happening in Atlanta next month. This is truly an awesome tech conference run by the Atlanta Java Users Group and I am so happy to be part of it as a speaker for the third time.

My talk this year is a presentation of patterns commonly used in microservice architectures. Each of the patterns will be explained and demoed live using Eclipse MicroProfile.

Microservice patterns in Eclipse Microprofile

Another think I look forward to at Devnexus is to meet up with will all the people participating in Jakarta EE that are present at the conference.

The party theme this year is R3, which stand for Reflect, Relax, Recharge and is definitely the place to be to meet all the awesome community members, Java Champions and Groundbreaker Ambassadors present! Everybody will be there, and so should YOU!

There is a limited number of super cool t-shirts exclusively made for this party. One of them could be yours simply by writing a blog post!

Java Community Process Update

The Java™ Community Process has been updated through JSR 387: Streamline the JCP Program. The most significant change is to open up for Iterative JSRs, i.e. JSRs that intend to deliver multiple releases of a technology on a time-based cadence. The driving force for this change is the 6 month release cadence for Java™ SE.

The first JSR using the option for being iterable is JSR 388: Java™ SE 13 (I guess the JSR name will have to be changed to not include the version number…).

Another change made in this update where changes to reviews and ballots in order to make the process even lighter to accommodate shorter release cycles.

The™ Java Community Process

Eclipse GlassFish 5.1 is here!

The release of Eclipse GlassFish 5.1 is an important milestone for Jakarta EE!

First of all, it is a confirmation that the GlassFish source code contributed by Oracle is possible to build and assemble on Eclipse Infrastructure.

Second, by passing the Java EE 8 Compatibility tests, it verifies that the code contributed follows the Java EE 8 specifications, hence is Java EE 8 Compatible.

Download Eclipse GlassFish 5.1 and give it a try!

And while you’re at it, why don’t you try it out with Apache NetBeans as I have shown below.

Eclipse GlassFish 5.1 in Apache NetBeans 10

2018 Annual Summary

It’s this time of the year again. Time for the yearly summary of conferences, travels, community activities, open source projects, amazing people!

Like most recent years, I have been speaking at quite a few conferences around the World. The countries I visited as a speaker in 2018 were Sweden, Germany, USA, England, Denmark, France, Belgium, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand.

Speaker Appearances 2018

One of the highlights this year was to be awarded the JCP Outstanding Spec Lead Award together with Christian Kaltepoth for our work with JSR 371.

Getting the JCP Award for Outstanding Spec Lead 2018

Another acknowledgement by the community was to be re-elected for an associate seat in the JCP Executive Committee.

Besides speaking at conferences, a great deal of my time in 2018 was dedicated Jakarta EE at the Eclipse Foundation where I act as the PMC Lead of EE4J a well as being a member of the Steering-, Specification-, and Marketing Committees in the Jakarta EE Working Group.

All in all 2018 was an eventful year and I expect no less of 2019!

Oracle Groundbreaker APAC Tour 2018

This year, I was so lucky to get the chance to be part of the Oracle Groundbreaker APAC Tour 2018. The cities that I joined the tour was Perth and Melbourne in Australia as well as Wellington in New Zealand.

Perth, Australia

Copenhagen – (Singapore) – Perth
Gone swimming…

In Perth, I did a talk called Serverless with Java. I demoed various FaaS options available, including running Fn Project on Oracle Cloud. Between the sessions, I also managed to slip outside for a swim in the ocean.

Melbourne, Australia

Perth – Melbourne
New bush hat

In Melbourne, I had two sessions scheduled. The first was an informal Q&A with the local Java User Group. We had great discussions regarding the 6 months release cadence of Java, we discussed Jakarta EE and Eclipse MicroProfile and talked about Java development and Java user groups in general.

Later that afternoon, I did my Serverless with Java talk for a small, but an enthusastic crowd. 

Wellington, New Zealand

Melbourne – Wellington
Installing fn on OKE

The last stop on the journey was Wellington, New Zealand. Even here, it was the Serverless with Java talk that was put on the schedule.

To spice things up a little, I did a last minute try to get fn up and running on a managed Kubernetes cluster in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure.

I was close, so the next time I do this talk this will be part of the demos…

Wrap up

This was a fantastic trip, even considering the busy travel schedule and probably spending more time in the air or at airports than on the ground. The trip home from Wellington took ~36 hours door-to-door with short layovers in Auckland, Perth, and Singapore.

WLG – AKL
AKL – PER
PER – SIN
SIN – CPH

Source Code

The Function Duke project on GitHub contains all the source code for my serverless talks.

JCP Elections 2018

Time flies like a banana…

It is almost two years since I was elected to the Java Community Process Executive Committee and the end of my term as a holder of one of the two associate seats are approaching. That means that the elections for representatives in the EC is going on, and you have a choice to make!

If you are an associate member of the JCP and haven’t already decided who to vote for in the ongoing election, please read my position statement for a motivation why you should vote for me.

A vote for me is a vote for the Community
 – Ivar Grimstad